Computerware

Access Control is Key to Your Business’ Security

Access Control is Key to Your Business’ Security

Access control is an extremely useful way to manage a secure computing infrastructure, and one of the best ways your organization can protect important data. However, with innovations in the way that access control is implemented, it’s time to consider what you can do to secure your business’ future in more ways than one. Let’s discuss some best practices regarding access control, as well as some technologies that you can implement to further cement your business’ security.

Ultimately, you should strive toward keeping employees out of information that they have no business having access to in the first place. For example, your human resources department might need access to sensitive information, such as Social Security numbers and dates of birth. Your accounting or finance department might have access to banking information for the purpose of direct deposit, or your business’ own credit card numbers to perform transactions. These employees might need access to this information in order to do their jobs, but the same can’t be said for other employees in your organization.

The ideal solution is to implement access on an individual basis or based on their roles within your organization. Your employees will only have access to information that is required for them to do their jobs, and nothing more. This keeps the risk factor associated with user access mitigated at all times so that you can focus on getting your job done.

Other ways you can provide secure access for your business’ assets is by implementing other barriers for access, such as two-factor authentication, biometric scanning, and physical security measures. Depending on your business’ specific industry, you’ll want a combination of these additional features to maximize your organization’s network security.

Two-Factor Authentication
At the very least, you should consider two-factor authentication, as it helps by adding an additional layer of security. Basically, you have to authenticate yourself further by providing a code that is sent to either a device or an email address that’s associated with your account. These solutions are implemented with the purpose of making things more difficult for would-be hackers, as they are unlikely to follow through with a difficult target.

Biometrics
If relying on a device doesn’t suit your needs, then perhaps you can use your physical characteristics and properties to secure your office and devices. Some systems are equipped with the ability to scan fingerprints and irises, secret agent style, with the intention of only offering those with matching results access to important information or locations. These technologies are becoming more readily available, and some are even offered on commercial products like laptops and smartphones. It’s a great way to make sure that hackers aren’t able to access devices without your specific biological traits.

Physical Security
Sometimes you will have a physical location that you want to protect as much as possible. Physical security often takes advantage of the above solutions, in addition to several others, to provide an adequate level of security for your chosen locations. Many business owners choose to secure their offices with card keys, security cameras, or electronic locks to keep outsiders from infiltrating. While these types of solutions are somewhat more in-depth and difficult to implement based on your location, they can be extraordinarily helpful for a business of any size.

Does your business need to reconsider access control for its most sensitive assets? Computerware can help you substantially improve your organization’s security. To learn more, reach out to us at (703) 821-8200.

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Sunday, July 22, 2018

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